Impact Of COVID-19 Pandemic On Couples’ Decisions To Conceive

20
Oct

Impact Of COVID-19 Pandemic On Couples’ Decisions To Conceive

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE’S  2021 SCIENTIFIC CONGRESS

Concerns about the risks of COVID-19 to pregnant women and their fetuses, lack of family support during labor and worries about job security or finances all contributed to decisions to suspend trying to conceive from March 2020 to April 2021.

A study reported at the 2021 ASRM Scientific Conference found that than among 16,000 people who were actively trying to conceive in the six months prior to COVID-19, 70% decided to temporarily pause their efforts specifically due to the pandemic. Another 6% said they were delaying their attempts at pregnancy indefinitely until after the pandemic.

The researchers found that temporary and longer-term changes in trying to conceive were comparable across all U.S. regions and ages, and the numbers of those putting it off temporarily were highest in the Northeast and lowest in the Southeast. The findings demonstrate the pandemic’s widespread impact on family building behavior, and the authors point out that reproductive medicine specialists should be prepared to support patients as they revisit their decisions, especially those whose fertility opportunities may be narrowing.

P-455, S. Malloy et al, READY (OR NOT): CHANGES IN CONCEPTION ATTEMPTS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC